Colonial Canada Document of Learning

I have eeny-meenie minie mo’d a green article from our incomplete table on the CRAAP test blog post. The resource I found is this – which was Eric’s article. It is entitled The Peopling of Canada, by Professor Phillip Buckner. I may have chose it randomly, but I actually made some connections with it in reading. I found the exact specifics of how Canada, a country rich with resources that many other countries in Europe did not have such a surplus of, struggled most with the one resource that all others are dependent on, the population.

“…The population of Canada at the time of Confederation in 1867 was around 3 ½ million, nearly seven times what it had been in 1815. The migration to Canada was remarkably homogeneous compared with the much larger migration to the United States in this period.”

This particular resource was interesting to me, because I have been taught about the resources that supported Canada’s economy in the times of it’s settlement and colonizing – furs, salmon and other fish primarily, however I never really thought about the resource of population and how crucial it is to a new and developing nation or colony. Without hunters or fishermen, all the furs or fish would still be running around, think of the lost profit! The other interesting aspect is the sheer amount of British people that immigrated to Canada. The article stated that the migration was homogeneous, because almost all of the citizens of what is now Canada were British in the early to mid 19th century.

The question I still have after reading this article is: Why is it that when Canada was a French colony (aptly titled New France) why did it struggle so much in accruing a sizeable population? The article states that after the British took the nation for themselves from the French, population skyrocketed by sevenfold in less than fifty years. How did this immense change come to the British and not to the French?

I believe this resource ties into prescribed learning outcome B, which covers culture. Some places of Canada, like Victoria or Ottawa, are very steeped in British culture. This is undoubtedly due to the heavy hand British immigrants had in forming Canada’s foundations. On the other hand, Quebec is very French based, and this is likely due to the French presence that was at one point the dominant nation in Canada. It is because of heavy and mixed European involvement that Canada has the unique culture dynamic that Canadians experience every day in the 21st century.